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Original article
Effect of high-intensity interval training on cardiovascular disease risk factors and body composition in psoriatic arthritis: a randomised controlled trial
  1. Ruth Stoklund Thomsen1,2,
  2. Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen1,3,
  3. Glenn Haugeberg4,5,
  4. Anja Bye6,7,
  5. Arthur Kavanaugh8 and
  6. Mari Hoff1,2,4
  1. 1 Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  2. 2 Department of Rheumatology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  3. 3 Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  4. 4 Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  5. 5 Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Hospital of Southern Norway Trust, Kristiansand, Norway
  6. 6 Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  7. 7 St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  8. 8 Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ruth Stoklund Thomsen; ruth.thomsen{at}ntnu.no

Abstract

Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is associated with an accumulation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on CVD risk factors in patients with PsA.

Methods We randomly assigned 61 patients with PsA (41 women and 20 men) to an intervention group performing HIIT for 11 weeks or a control group who were instructed to not change their physical exercise habits. Outcomes were assessed at 3 and 9  months with measures on maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), fat percentage and Body Mass Index (BMI). We used linear mixed models to calculate mean difference with 95% CI between the groups according to the intention-to-treat principle.

Results At 3  months, the HIIT group had a 3.72  mL/kg/min (95%  CI 2.38 to 5.06) higher VO2max and a 1.28 (95% CI −2.51 to −0.05) lower truncal fat percentage than controls. There was also some evidence that the HIIT group had lower total fat percentage (−0.80; 95%  CI −1.71 to 0.10) and slightly lower BMI (−0.31; 95%  CI −0.78 to 0.17) than the control group. At 9  months, the HIIT group had still a higher VO2max (3.08; 95%  CI 1.63 to 4.53) than the control group, whereas the difference in other factors were small.

Conclusion In patients with PsA, 3  months with HIIT was associated with a substantial increase in VO2max and a reduction in truncal fat percentage compared with controls. The beneficial effect on VO2max was also sustained through 9  months.

Trial registration number NCT02995460.

  • psoriatic arthritis
  • cardiovascular disease
  • treatment

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Footnotes

  • Contributors RST: conception and design of the trial, performing the trial, statistical analyses and interpretation of the data, writing. TILN: statistical analyses and interpretation of the data, writing. GH: interpretation of the data, writing. AB: design of the trial, writing. AK: interpretation of the data, writing. MH: conception and design of the trial, interpretation of the data, writing.

  • Funding RST has received a grant from The Norwegian ExtraFoundation for Health and Rehabilitation.

  • Disclaimer The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics in South-Eastern Norway.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement There are no additional unpublished data from the study.

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